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Can Entrepreneurs be “Too Ambitious”?

Global Entrepreneurs Week takes place November 18th – 24th, 2013. It is imperative to understand and even embrace the challenges that entrepreneurs face, and to understand that they have very specific conative needs. When these needs are ignored or diminished in efforts to be “accepted” then innovation succumbs to the status quo and people question their own natural instincts and drives.

Amy Bruske, Kolbe Corp’s President, experienced this before she knew about conation or understood her M.O. of 3583. She has an innate need and drive to innovate, coupled with the ambition to accomplish as much as she can – Kolbe calls it operating at a four and five level on the Dynamynd®. Here is her story:

When I was 18 years old, my boyfriend told me that I was "too ambitious."  This was a shocking point of view that I had never considered before.  Was there such a thing as being “too ambitious”?  "Why do you have to run a business if you are going to be a mother?" he asked. 

Within a few months of that discussion, I got into an argument with a group of girlfriends as we were discussing our future goals.  Once again, I found myself defending my desire to go out of state for college and become a businesswoman.  All hell really broke loose when I defiantly stated "Well! I never want to rely on any one else for money and I certainly don't want to buy my husband a birthday present with money that he made!"   My immaturity was apparent in the words I chose to justify my position, and I had never considered that some of my friends would take that statement as an attack on their own mothers who had all chosen to be stay-at-home moms.  My self-esteem took a hit and I started to feel like there must be something wrong with me. 

It wasn't until I started meeting other business majors in college that I realized that there were other women who had similar goals.  All of us would dream about running companies and discuss which industries could best fit our talents.    Finally, I was around other women who wanted to have families and work, and didn't think that such a goal was selfish or crazy.  It was life changing and affirming for me.

A few years later, I found myself in the position of being the oddball again when I married my college sweetheart who had become a professional baseball player. I met many lovely women, but I definitely stood out as being one of the only baseball-wives with a career.  My husband and I frequently received unsolicited advice from coaches and scouts who told us how impossible it was going to be for us both to juggle work and build a life together.  On one flight with the team, the pitching coach stopped at my seat and immediately reacted to what I was reading by saying, "in all my years of playing and coaching baseball, I've NEVER seen a wife read a BusinessWeek Magazine!"  Then there was the time when one of the major league wives was shocked to hear that I had a job, and yelled over several other women, "You work?" When I said "Yes," her follow up question was simply, "WHY?"  I didn’t even know how to respond to this.  Luckily, I was more mature than my 18 year old self and realized that as long as my husband was in this sport I would experience many more conversations like this and a snippy reaction would not be helpful.

Recently, all of these memories came flooding back to me while I was giving advice to my son and found myself encouraging him to seek out people who share similar goals and values when he gets to college. Then it hit me...THIS is one of the reasons I love being a leader at Kolbe Corp! I love getting to work with like-minded staff and clients who are goal-oriented and strive for constant growth in whatever matters to them most. This is also why I am passionate about the Young Entrepreneur's Academy, a program that educates the next generation of business leaders.  “Is there such a thing as being too ambitious?”  If I had access to such a program in High School, I would never have given that question a second thought!

Kolbe Corp encourages you to know and understand your M.O. and those of the people who matter to you (of any age) so that you can use that understanding to improve their lives in the ways they care about most…THIS can change the world!

 

 

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